Curriculum Options

We are proud to offer a wide range of high quality subjects and qualifications within our Sixth Form. We provide various pathways of study that enable all students to progress and succeed in their journey beyond the Sixth Form. Students are able to follow either an Advanced Level Academic pathway or a Level 3 Vocational pathway  depending on which is most suited to them as an individual.

Our curriculum:

  • provides students with choice and flexibility
  • allows study of a range of subjects
  • enables students to combine subjects requiring different styles of learning (e.g. conceptual, experiential or practical)
  • eases progression from GCSE to A Level study
  • maximises future options and prospects
  • offers a range of learning experiences.

You will be encouraged to take responsibility for your work and to demonstrate a mature outlook in an environment that is very different from anything you have experienced so far in your education. In addition, students have the opportunity to study additional qualifications and undertake enrichment activities.

Please click on the links below to download the curriculum overview plans for each KS5 subject:

Yr12-Curriculum-Overviews.zip

Year-13-Curriculum-Overview-Plans.zip

Extended Project Qualification

The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is an opportunity to undertake a project investigating a subject about which you feel strongly. You may choose a topic related to your other courses or take the opportunity to follow a personal passion. It provides a context for critical thinking and project management skills. EPQ is only offered at AS Level.

The taught element of the EPQ is delivered over two scheduled sessions per fortnight. In addition to the whole group lessons, you are likely to have small group and individual sessions with your supervisor for further support at each of the review stages of your project and you should be in regular contact with your supervisor by email. AQA expects 120 hours of study, which means a significant commitment of your own time, preparing you for the way you will be expected to work at university.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

At Lytchett, we encourage our students to develop their wider knowledge and understanding of the world, and one way we do this is through the use of MOOCs. A MOOC is a massive open online course. They are usually developed by universities and can be on any topic at all, from the history of football to understanding biodiversity, and from an introduction to Mandarin to preparing for university. MOOCs usually take the form of a selection of articles, online questions and videos and often offer participants the opportunity to share ideas, knowledge and experiences with fellow learners online. Participation is usually free and is always flexible. Courses can be as short as a few hours over the course of a week through to six or more hours a week over a period of months. Some providers require participants to pay for a certificate but these are rarely necessary. MOOCs can be undertaken to help students see if a particular subject is something they might want to study at university, to find out more about something that really interests them or to do some extra work around a subject they are studying.

Universities and apprenticeship providers like to see some evidence of further study beyond the classroom, and MOOCs are a great way of showing this. Some parents have also enjoyed studying a MOOC! A wide range of MOOCs can be found in the search on Unifrog on their dedicated MOOC page, or through Future Learn – a website managed by the Open University, drawing together a huge selection of MOOCs starting each week from a diverse range of institutions.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Applied Science

INTRODUCTION

New at Lytchett Minster School for September 2024
We are planning to offer the BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Applied Science (single award, 1 A-level equivalent). This is designed to be studied alongside two other Level 3 courses including BTECs and A-levels. The BTEC Level 3 Nationals in Applied Science are for students seeking an A-level standard science qualification who wish to continue their education through applied learning and who aim to progress to higher education or apprenticeships and ultimately employment in the applied science sector.

A qualification in Applied Science can lead to many degree level science courses (when combined with appropriate A-level subjects) including: Psychology, Environmental Sciences, Biological Sciences, Medical professions, Food Science, Communication Industry, Satellite Communications and Materials Science. Students will study across Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

The course will be delivered via a range of practical and theory-based sessions with an emphasis on the application of scientific principles across all three sciences. Students produce written reports, presentations, laboratory log and analyse case studies. Assessment is by a combination of internal assessment of laboratory work, written work and presentations and by externally set and assessed written exams.

Topics Covered

There are three compulsory units and one optional unit.  The compulsory units are:
Unit 1: Principles and Applications of Science 1
Unit 2: Practical Scientific Procedures and Techniques
Unit 3: Science investigation skills
Unit 4: Chosen from a wide range of optional units.

Minimum Entry Requirements

Three grade 4’s from three Single Award GCSE Sciences, or two grade 4 from Double award GCSE Science, plus grade 4 in Maths and English. Grade 5’s in GCSE Sciences and Maths are preferred.

 

Introduction

Biology is rapidly changing, with new discoveries and ideas being reported on an almost daily basis. The advances in genetics, cell biology and medicine will impact on all our lives. The biology course at Lytchett aims to provide an in-depth understanding of these developments while maintaining a sense of wonder of the natural world.

Summary of course content

The OCR course is designed for those students who wish to develop their interest in and enthusiasm for biology. Key concepts are tackled, such as how genes control animal functions, conservation and how we deal with disease. Synoptic links between different areas are stressed in the course.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Foundations in biology
• Biological molecules
• Basic components of living systems
• Enzymes
• Plasma membranes
• Cell divisions

Exchange and transport
• Exchange surfaces and breathing
• Transport in animals and plants

Biodiversity, evolution and disease
• Classification and evolution
• Biodiversity
• Communicable diseases

Communication, homeostasis and energy
• Excretion as an example of homeostatic control
• Neural and hormonal communication
• Plant and animal responses
• Photosynthesis and respiration

Genetics, evolution and ecosystems
• Cellular control
• Patterns of inheritance
• Manipulating genomes
• Cloning and biotechnology
• Ecosystems
• Populations and sustainability

Assessment

There are regular assessment tasks set within the class which consist of practical work; this is an integral part of the course. Over the period of the two years, students will complete twelve required practicals. Students may be awarded a practical endorsement attached to their A Level if these practicals are completed to the appropriate standard. The skills gained during the practical work will be assessed as part of the examination papers. Students complete three examination papers at the end of the course.

Paper 1: Biological processes – 100 marks, 2 hrs 15 min, 37% of total A Level
Paper 2: Biological diversity – 100 marks, 2 hrs 15 min, 37% of total A Level
Paper 3: Unified biology – 70 marks, 1 hr 30 min, 26% of total A Level

Methods of working

Students receive ten lessons in a two-week cycle shared between two teachers. A high emphasis is placed on practical work and its use in a biological context. The biology specification is taught through applications and real-life contextual content wherever possible. It is expected that, in addition to set homework, students will undertake a significant amount of self-study in their own time. A field trip forms an integral part of the course.

Skills acquired

Students will develop the ability to think logically and apply their knowledge to novel situations. They will also need to critically analyse data and draw conclusions from that information. Good practical skills are required to undertake experimental work.

Where the course leads

The course offers an excellent preparation for students entering work or higher education. Scientific careers, such as medicine, nursing, environmental work, veterinary science and agriculture, are an obvious link. A science qualification is useful to prospective employers, showing that you are numerate, capable of logical thought and good at problem solving.

Special entry requirements

A minimum of GCSE grade 6 in combined science or biology and a grade 5 in English and mathematics.

Introduction

Chemistry is a fascinating, challenging and useful qualification. It supports studies in other sciences and psychology and is essential for anyone wishing to follow a career in medicine, veterinary science, chemical engineering, pharmacy or pharmacology. It is also a valuable preparation for engineering and science degree courses or work in areas such as health, the food industry, textiles and design and technology.

Summary of course content

Practical work is an integral part of the course. During the two years, students will complete a minimum of twelve required practicals. Students may be awarded a practical endorsement attached to their A Level if these practicals are completed to the appropriate standard. The skills gained during the practical work will be assessed as part of the examination papers.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Physical chemistry
• Equilibria
• Atomic structure and chemical bonding
• Amount of substance
• Oxidation and reduction
• Acids and bases
• Thermodynamics

Organic chemistry
• Introduction to organic chemistry
• Organic functional groups and their reactions
• Biochemical molecules

Inorganic chemistry
• Patterns down groups and across periods
• The transition metals
• Ions in solution

Assessment

A Level students will complete three examination papers at the end of the course.
Paper 1: Inorganic and physical chemistry – 105 marks, 2 hours.
Paper 2: Organic and physical chemistry – 105 marks, 2 hours.
Paper 3: Synoptic – 90 marks, 2 hours.
20% of the papers will contain mathematical skills equivalent to Level 2 or above.

How the course differs from GCSE

The content is a development of the ideas introduced at GCSE. The importance of chemical structure and bonding in order to explain the properties of elements and compounds is considered for many situations. Organic chemistry is developed and includes a wider range of compounds. There is a much greater emphasis on chemical calculations, with students required to apply these skills in virtually every topic. There is also a greater emphasis on the ability to study independently and to read around the subject.

Skills acquired

• Data analysis and the application of ideas to solve problems
• Practical skills, working with greater precision and accuracy than at GCSE
• Recording and communicating experimental data
• Assessing the reliability and validity of data
• A body of knowledge which will support sciences and many other subjects

Where the course leads

Medicine, veterinary science, chemical engineering and pharmacy or pharmacology will require chemistry. Work or training in science, health, agriculture, the food industry, textiles, engineering, design and technology will benefit from a knowledge of chemistry. A qualification in chemistry is highly valued by many universities.

Special entry requirements

Students will be required to have achieved a grade 6 in GCSE chemistry or combined science. In addition, a grade 6 is required in GCSE mathematics.

Introduction

Studying business studies at A Level gives students the chance to explore real life issues that are reflected in today’s global world. The course relies upon students participating actively in lessons, discussing important issues such as how important is marketing to achieve business growth? How do interest rates affect customers and businesses? What makes a business successful? What government policies can make a difference in business? These and other issues are explored using a wide range of resources. This course develops transferable skills for progression to higher education and the world of work.

Summary of course content

The A Level is structured into four coherent themes to support teaching and learning.

  1. Introduces students to marketing and people (Year 1)
  2. Introduces students to managing business activities (Year 1)
  3. Explores business decisions and strategy (Year 2)
  4. Explores global business (Year 2)

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

• Ethics
• The market and marketing mix strategy
• Managing people
• Raising finance
• Global competitiveness
• Raising Finance
• Protectionism
• Financial planning
• Managing finance
• Resource management
• Impact of globalisation
• M.N.C
• Growing economies
• External influences – economics

Assessment

There are three externally-assessed papers at A Level. Each paper comprises 100 marks and is two hours in duration. Questions comprise short answer, data response and essay. Paper 3 has a broad, pre-released context to support the investigative nature of the qualification.

Paper 1: Theme 2 and 3
Paper 2: Theme 1 and 4
Paper 3: Pre-release and all themes.

How the course differs from GCSE

This specification provides a smooth transition from GCSE business studies but students will be looking in more depth at what makes a business successful, concentrating on more analysis and evaluation rather than basic pros and cons. It avoids unnecessary repetition whilst ensuring that learners new to the subject are appropriately supported. There will be more theories and concepts, including presentations from professionals, as well as more field visits with scope to apply these to real life situations, allowing students to gain an in-depth insight into the way a business can succeed.

Skills acquired

Students develop the ability to analyse, critically evaluate, present, roleplay and read extensively to support their understanding of the principles underlying successful businesses and business practices in the world around us. These skills are highly valued and offer excellent preparation for university and employment alike.

Where the course leads

A qualification in business is useful in all employment, whether it be running your own business or working for one. Because of the broad spectrum of the course, it easily paves the way to study a whole range of courses in higher education. It also provides a good foundation for students seeking a career in advertising, finance, marketing, law and many others. Students will also get the opportunity to take part in the national Young Enterprise competition from September to April in year 1.

Special entry requirements

This course does require a good level of ability in both English and mathematics, so students will be expected to have achieved  grade 5’s in both at GCSE. It is not compulsory to have studied business at GCSE, but a grade 5 is recommended for those students who have studied GCSE business. Students should be prepared to read and investigate widely around business issues and undertake their own research as the business world is constantly changing.

Introduction

No area of industry or employment can perform well without the use of computer systems. Almost every job will demand the use of computers to manage information or external events. Increasingly, those who are operating these computers are expected to have some fundamental understanding of how they work and how they can be maintained. It is therefore important to be able to develop computational thinking. The study of computation is about what can be computed and how to compute it. Computer science involves questions that have the potential to change how we view the world – for example, we may be computing with DNA at some stage in the future, with computer circuits made of genes.

Summary of course content

Topics covered include problem-solving, algorithm design, computer programming/coding, the binary number system, database systems, hardware and software, computer networks and how the Internet works.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Computing principles
• The characteristics of contemporary processors
• Input, output and storage devices
• Software and software development
• Programming
• Exchanging data
• Data types, data structures
• Algorithms
• Legal, moral, ethical and cultural issues

Algorithms and problem solving
• Elements of computational thinking
• Problem solving
• Programming
• Algorithms

Programming project
Students will choose a computing problem to work through according to the guidance in the specification. Students will have to demonstrate analysis of the problem, design of the solution, developing the solution and evaluation.

Assessment

Computing principles: Written paper – 2 hrs 30 min, 40% of A Level.
Algorithms and problem solving: Written paper – 2 hrs 30 min, 40% of A Level.
Programming project: Coursework – 20% of A Level.

Skills acquired

This course will help you develop a range of skills including abstract thinking, general problem-solving, algorithmic and mathematical reasoning, scientific and engineering-based thinking. You will also develop fundamental computer programming skills which will prepare you well for games and computer programming courses provided at university level.

Where the course leads

A qualification in computer science works well with many subjects, especially those that require analytical or scientific thinking and logic. Those studying computer science could go on to a career in computer programming, games programming, medicine, law, business, politics or any type of science.

Special entry requirements

This course offers a natural progression from studying computer science at GCSE, which will have provided good foundation knowledge. However, this course is not exclusive to those who have studied GCSE computing but it is probable that students will have demonstrated suitable potential by achieving grade 4 or above in most GCSEs studied. Students are expected to have achieved a grade 5 or above in mathematics at GCSE.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Core Maths

INTRODUCTION

New at Lytchett Minster School for September 2024, we are planning to offer the Level 3 AS Mathematical studies, commonly known as Core Maths. Most A Levels include an element of mathematical or statistical analysis, some of which is beyond the scope of the GCSE curriculum. This is where Core Maths is a subject to choose it is where you get to use your mathematical skills in a real-world context. It is a fantastic companion to study alongside three A levels or BTEC equivalents. Universities and employers alike consider Core Maths to be a great asset and students who have studied this course are sometimes offered reduced offers from universities, as, by undertaking this course, they evidence that they can cope with the mathematical demands of a higher course. Core Maths develops real-world problem-solving skills, using Maths. The course is ideal for someone going on to study biology, psychology, sociology, geography, business and many more courses that require skills of data analysis.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 curriculum Overview

Topics Covered

There are three compulsory units and other optional units.
The compulsory units are:
Unit 1: Analysis of Data
Unit 2: Maths for Personal Finance
Unit 3: Estimation
Unit 4: Critical Analysis of Given Data and Models
The fifth unit will be chosen from a wide range of optional units

Minimum Entry Requirements

Although beneficial if grade 5 in GCSE Maths has been achieved, students will be permitted to take this course if they have achieved a grade 4 in GCSE Maths.

WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology
For further information, please see Miss Cecchinato, or email cecchinatoa@lytchett.org.uk

Introduction

An understanding of criminology is relevant to many job roles within the criminal justice sector, social and probation work and sociology and psychology. WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology is a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology that complements studies in humanities. This is an Applied General qualification. This means it is designed primarily to support learners progressing to university. It has been designed to offer exciting and interesting experiences that focus learning for post-16 learners through applied learning, i.e. through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful contexts linked to the criminal justice system. The qualification would support learners’ progression from any study at Level 2, particularly GCSEs in Sociology, Law, Psychology, Citizenship, History and Humanities.

Skills Acquired

The applied purpose allows learners to learn in such a way that they develop:
• skills required for independent learning and development
• a range of generic and transferable skills
• the ability to solve problems
• the skills of project-based research, development and presentation
• the fundamental ability to work alongside other professionals, in a professional
  environment
• the ability to apply learning in vocational contexts

Assessment

The WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology is assessed using a combination of internal and external assessment.

Unit Number Unit Title   Assessment GLH
1 Changing Awareness of Crime Mandatory Internal 90
2 Criminological Theories Mandatory External 90
3 Crime Scene to Court Room Mandatory Internal 90
4 Crime and Punishment Mandatory External 90

Learners must complete ALL Units

Topics Covered

Unit 1 will enable the learner to demonstrate understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported.
Unit 2 will allow learners to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have learnt in Unit 1.
Unit 3 will provide an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict. Learners will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.
Unit 4 learners will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.
Each unit within the qualification has an applied purpose which acts as a focus for the learning in the unit. The applied purpose demands learning related to authentic case studies. It also requires learners to consider how the use and application of their learning impacts on themselves, other individuals, employers, society and the environment.

Where the course leads

The qualification not only supports university applications but also allows learners to gain the required understanding and skills to be able to consider employment within some aspects of the criminal justice system, e.g. the National Probation Service, the Courts and Tribunals Service or the National Offender Management Service.

Minimum Entry Requirements

A minimum of five GCSE subjects at grade 4 or above including Maths and English Language.

Introduction

The drama course offers students the opportunity to extend practical and analytical skills. The key features are:
• emphasis on practical drama
• developing directing and devising skills
• individual and group performance work
• creativity and independence, allowing students to become effective theatre makers.

Summary of course content

There are exciting new developments in this subject which allow students to identify the interrelationship between performer, designer and director. There is a chance to study performance texts which combine those selected by us as a centre alongside prescribed choices made by Edexcel. The previous four units have now been developed into three components which are explained below.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

• Exploration of two plays through practical application and analytical study, including interpretation, language and creative responses which are assessed through the written examination
• Experience of live theatre
• Experience group performance to an audience
• Interpretive decision-making and opportunity for devising
• Contribution to a monologue or duologue
• Creative interpretation of original texts

Assessment

Component 1: devising – 40% of A Level
Students are required to devise a piece of theatre inspired by a stimulus set by the centre. This unit is divided into two parts: performance and a documented portfolio of process.

Component 2: text in performance – 20% of A Level
A group performance/design realisation of a key extract from a performance text and a monologue/duologue assessed by an external examiner.

Component 3: theatre makers in practice (written examination) – 40% of A Level
A two-hour thirty-minute examination assessed through three sections: live theatre evaluation, page to stage (realising a performance text) and interpreting a performance text.

How the course differs from GCSE

The new specification has been written to allow for a smooth transition from GCSE to A Level. Students continue to explore and interpret a number of performance texts, developing performance skills and discipline. The course also allows students to understand and analyse theatre history and its developments in the 21st Century.

Skills acquired

• Acting
• Performance skills
• Design realisation
• Vocal/physical characterisation areas
• Understanding of play production and performance
• Evaluation and research – theatre history and developments

Where the course leads

The course leads smoothly to any university course in drama, performing arts, English, media, communication, etc. It provides a solid foundation for any career involving performance, whether theatre, film, media or public relations, law, sales, customer-based industries and personnel.

Special entry requirements

Previous experience and some dramatic knowledge are essential. It is expected that students will be willing to give the necessary time and commitment to rehearsal and productions. Students should have obtained a grade 5 or above in English and a grade 5 in practical areas within drama. Students with minimal drama experience should discuss the course prior to uptake.

Introduction

Understanding and enjoying a wide range of literature will offer students a source of pleasure for the rest of their lives. This course offers the chance to come into contact with a variety of literature as well as a qualification which can be the foundation for further study or the basis of a profession. This course has proved to be very popular with students at Lytchett.

This is an exciting and challenging course. In addition to the set texts, students are encouraged to pursue a personal reading programme in order to develop an understanding and appreciation of different literary genres and techniques. If you don’t enjoy reading, this isn’t for you. The department also organises a variety of theatre visits, conferences and seminars to stimulate students’ interest and broaden their awareness.

Summary of course content

There are seven core set texts, studied over the course of the two years. Students will study a mixture of prose, poetry and drama texts, including Hamlet (Shakespeare), The Duchess of Malfi (Webster), A Streetcar Named Desire (Williams), Small Island (Levy), and the poetry of T.S Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Christina Rossetti. They will also need to select a satellite text from a prescribed list for comparison in their NEA.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

80% examination, 20% coursework (NEA).

How the course differs from GCSE

The course is different from GCSE English Literature in several ways. Generally, the groups are smaller and a great number of the lessons will rely on discussion; this will mean that students will not only have to speak up and give their views but, from time to time, they will need to give presentations to the rest of the group on particular scenes or chapters from their set texts. Therefore it is really important that they seek to enjoy the set books and become as involved as possible in discussion, as this will not only help them but everyone in the group. The course also looks far more at writers’ techniques. Students should be aware that the set texts are challenging and that some elements of the examination are ‘closed text’ (Shakespeare, Webster and Williams).

Methods of working and skills acquired

Some of these have already been emphasised. Students must see their presence on the course as a positive choice and an opportunity to gain valuable skills and insight. They should expect to acquire improved literary skills, the ability to argue in written and spoken form, and a lasting enjoyment of reading. Students will have to read by themselves and be ready to present ideas.

Where the course leads

Many of our past students have studied English at university and this A Level course provides a sound basis for further study of all English courses.

The skills developed during the course, particularly those of communication, formulating and developing ideas, analysis and debating a point of view are a solid basis for a wide variety of courses and careers; these include law, teaching, journalism, personnel, marketing, advertising and management.

Special entry requirements

Students should enjoy reading and, more importantly, be willing to extend the breadth of their reading to whole new areas of literature. A willingness to take part in discussions is essential as these will form the basis of most lessons. Most of all, students should be determined to gain much more than simply a qualification from this course.

Students are required to have obtained a grade 6 at GCSE in English Literature and a grade 5 in English Language.

Introduction

The EPQ is an opportunity to undertake a project investigating a subject about which you feel strongly. You may choose a topic related to your other courses or take the opportunity to follow a personal passion. It provides a context for critical thinking and project management skills. EPQ is only offered at AS Level.

Summary of course content

You choose your area of study in negotiation with a supervisor and submit it for formal approval. You identify and draft your main aims and objectives before planning, researching and delivering your project. The process is recorded in a production log, which is submitted with your final project. You will have to obtain and select information from a wide range of different sources, analyse your data and show that you understand the complexities of the topic you have chosen.

Topics covered

• Formulating aims and objectives
• Planning a project
• Taking notes and record-keeping
• Assessing the reliability and validity of sources
• Critical thinking
• Research methodology
• Referencing and plagiarism
• Decision making
• Presentation skills, including how to handle a question and answer session
• Evaluating the project and your own strengths and weaknesses

Assessment

Every student has a production log to complete as a documented journey of their project. The evidence of your project is likely to be a 5,000-word written report but it may be an artefact accompanied by a 1,000-word report. Near the end of your project, you will make a presentation of your research, which will be video-recorded, and you will be expected to answer questions.

Methods of working

The taught element of the EPQ is delivered over two scheduled sessions per fortnight. In addition to the whole group lessons, you are likely to have small group and individual sessions with your supervisor for further support at each of the review stages of your project and you should be in regular contact with your supervisor by email. AQA expects 120 hours of study, which means a significant commitment of your own time, preparing you for the way you will be expected to work at university.

Skills acquired

Completing the EPQ will help you develop your own organisational, project management and independent learning skills. These will help you become a more confident student in other areas of study.

Where the course leads

Being successful in EPQ is likely to enhance your application to higher education. It will help you stand out from other students, both in your personal statement and in an interview.

Special entry requirements

Because of the special nature of this course, the students suitable for EPQ are those who anticipate grades 6-9 from their subjects at GCSE, are well motivated and enthusiastic, can demonstrate their commitment to working independently and have a good track record of meeting deadlines.

Introduction

This course is equivalent to two full A Levels and requires real commitment. Whilst mass media forms a major part of everyone’s life, the variety of jobs where media skills and knowledge are needed is expanding greatly and this is reflected in the growing number of media-related degree courses at university level, many of which have a strong vocational focus.

This BTEC aims to prepare students for this world by teaching professional practices in a vocational context.

Summary of course content

This course is designed to give learners a technical understanding of film and television production. Learners gain knowledge and skills in areas such as single and multi-camera techniques, lighting, and sound recording and editing to produce practical film and television projects.

Equivalent in size to two A Levels, this course consists of 10 units of which four are mandatory and two are external. Mandatory content comprises 50% of the final grade and external counts for 33%.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

• Digital media skills
• Media enterprise
• Responding to a commission
• Film production
• Script writing
• Single camera techniques
• Film editing
• Stop frame animation
• Sound editing
• Sound recording

Assessment

The new courses are being modified but the biggest change will be the introduction of a mandatory externally assessed unit: digital media skills and responding to a commission.

How the course differs from GCSE

Whilst GCSE media provides a general introductory study of media forms and techniques across television, radio and print media, the BTEC focusses particularly on moving image, allowing for the study of a range of different genres, including drama, documentary and animation. There are also added opportunities to produce radio drama and develop script-writing techniques.

Photoshop is now a key skill in many media industries, and there is a specific unit that now assesses digital graphics in recognition of this.

Skills acquired

Vocational skills relevant to media workers are developed, with particular importance given to research skills, organisational skills, writing and creative digital techniques across a range of professional software and equipment.

Above all, team working and leadership skills are given space to develop across a range of increasingly complex assignments.

Where the course leads

Media-related employment is one of the fastest growing areas, particularly in Dorset, where the Regional Development Agency recognises it as key to the region’s economic future (most large firms now have PR managers who are media trained). The main route into media jobs is through university and this BTEC is fully recognised by UCAS as equivalent to 2 A Levels.

Special entry requirements

In addition to GCSE grades 4 in English and Maths, students will be expected to evidence a genuine interest in creative media work.

Introduction

This is an exciting and stimulating course for students who have developed a proven enthusiasm for the subject. The course provides an interesting and lively involvement in a broad range of art and design activities which students can then use to develop their own ideas. The breadth of study makes this a challenging course for motivated and creative individuals and opens the door to a wealth of career opportunities in the visual arts.

Summary of course content

• Practical exploration and refinement of the use of a broad range of materials, processes and techniques, e.g. drawing, printmaking, painting, sculpture and digital imaging
• How ideas can be conveyed and interpreted in images and artefacts
• The use of knowledge of other artists’ work to develop ideas and provide sources of inspiration
• How to critically evaluate your own work and present ideas to an audience
• Visits to local and national art exhibitions will take place during the course

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

• Formulating aims and objectives
• Planning a project
• Taking notes and record-keeping
• Assessing the reliability and validity of sources
• Critical thinking
• Research methodology
• Referencing and plagiarism
• Decision making
• Presentation skills, including how to handle a question and answer session
• Evaluating the project and your own strengths and weaknesses

Assessment

You will be assessed on the practical work that you produce throughout the two year course. This will be supported by written annotation and research into other artists and designers and students will also be required to produce an extended essay as part of component one in Year 13. During Year 12, students will concentrate on acquiring and refining practical skills and learn how to use these alongside their artist research in the development and refinement of creative ideas.

Component one – Personal Investigation: In Year 13, you will develop work for a personal investigation into an idea, concept or theme, supported by written material; this will count for 60% of your total A Level marks.

Component two – Externally Set Assignment: You will be asked to produce personal work in response to one of eight exciting starting points, which will count for 40% of your total A Level mark.

Methods of working

Much of the course involves the experimentation and refinement of practical art and design skills; however, in developing students’ critical understanding there is a significant amount of written work. Fine art includes drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture, and students will have the opportunity to explore many ways of working. Observational drawing and critical and contextual studies are an essential part of this course and form the starting point for visual research and exploration of ideas and images. We encourage independent visits to art galleries, as well as organising group visits to local and national art and design exhibitions and events.

Where the course leads

The visual arts offer an expanding and exciting range of careers for talented individuals in a large and growing area of the UK economy. Students can progress to a higher education course in a wide range of visual arts specialisms or in other subject areas.

Special entry requirements

Self-motivation and tenacity are important attributes for a successful fine art student of this demanding but rewarding course.

For those students who have completed GCSE art and design they need to have achieved grade 5. Where no previous art qualification has been taken, prospective students will need to demonstrate a proven enthusiasm for the subject.

Introduction

Are you interested in the following topics: diet, health, marketing, new product design, current issues, changes in society, lifestyle, cookery, business…? If so, this may be an appropriate course for you!

This is an applied general qualification and replaces GCE catering, food technology and food and nutrition.

Summary of course content

Students study the subject in the context of a multi-cultural, changing, contemporary society. It explores the relationship between food, nutrition and health and offers the opportunity for creative, investigative and analytical study.

The course will give learners the opportunity to:
• Demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment
• Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks
• Understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
• Understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
• Understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

The WJEC Level 3 Qualification

Diploma – three units – Units one and two are mandatory; one from units three and four. Studying one of the two optional units will allow learners the opportunity to study subjects of particular interest or relevance to them, building on previous learning and experience.

Unit 1: Meeting nutritional needs of specific groups
Internally and externally assessed
This unit will give students an understanding of the nutrients required in the diet, their functions in the body and how nutritional requirements vary in different situations. Students will have the opportunity to develop the practical skills needed to interpret recipes, and prepare and cook complex dishes to form the basis of a menu to meet the needs of specific individuals.

Unit 2: Ensuring food is safe to eat
Externally assessed
This unit will give students an understanding of hazards and risks in relation to the storage, preparation and cooking of food in different environments and the control measures needed to minimise the risks. Again, practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience.

Unit 3: Experimenting to solve food production problems
Internally assessed
This unit will give students the opportunity to use their understanding of the properties of food to plan and carry out experiments. The results of the experiments would be used to propose options to solve food production problems.

Unit 4: Current issues in consumer food choice
Internally assessed
This unit will develop the skills needed to plan, carry out and present a research project on current issues related to consumer food choice.

Assessment

Internal and external assessment; internally assessed units are through summative controlled assessments. There is one exam at the end of the first year. Performance bands are pass, merit and distinction.

Entry requirements

Students are expected to have obtained grade 4s in English, maths and science.

Where the course leads

Jobs directly related include: animal nutritionist, dietician, food technologist, nutritional therapist, product/process development scientist, technical brewer, toxicologist.

 

Introduction

Globalisation of world markets, the expansion of the European Community and increasing opportunities for travel are creating an environment in which language skills can open more and more doors. However, languages really come into their own when set alongside expertise in another field. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that French will nowadays combine with any other A Level subjects.

Summary of course content

Changes in French society
• The family structure
• Education
• The world of work

The political and artistic culture in French-speaking countries
• Music
• Media
• Festivals and traditions

Immigration and the multicultural French society
• Integration and multiculturalism
• The rise of the Front National

Occupation and resistance
• Occupation in World War II
• The Résistance

Students will also study two French works: a book (Un sac de billes) and a film (Intouchables).

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

Three examination papers:
• Listening, reading and translation
• Written response to works (book and film) and translation
• Speaking

How the course differs from GCSE

In terms of content, the emphasis shifts from students’ needs as visitors to a French-speaking country to a look at contemporary issues from a French perspective. As regards the actual examination, the four skills are spread among three papers.

Skills acquired

Building on the language acquired at GCSE, students learn to express themselves with increasing accuracy and sophistication, both orally and in writing, on a wide range of issues of contemporary interest. At the same time, they learn to tackle authentic written and spoken texts of an increasingly complex nature. In doing so, they gain an insight into the culture and values of another society.

Where the course leads

Specialist language occupations include interpreting, translating and teaching. However, in an increasingly international environment, practically any job (whether based in the UK or abroad) can involve the use of languages. For those who go on to higher education, it is possible to study French alongside a wide range of other subjects.

Special entry requirements

• Students should have an interest in the issues of the day and in the culture of Francophone countries, along with an enthusiasm for discussing these in French.
• If possible, students should spend at least one reasonable period in France during the course.
• Students will need at least a grade 6 in GCSE French.

Introduction

As mathematics is such a vast subject, it is impossible to cover it all in one course. Further mathematics extends the breadth and depth of study; some of the concepts met in A-Level mathematics are extended, whilst some topics not met on the standard A-Level course are introduced.

The course is aimed at very able mathematicians who enjoy the subject and are keen to go beyond A Level mathematics. Many students taking this course go on to study mathematics or a mathematics-related degree at university such as engineering. For many university courses, completion of further mathematics can lead to a lower offer for entry.

Summary of course content

Half of the course contact is further pure mathematics and includes the following topics.

Topics covered

• Proof
• Complex numbers
• Matrices
• Further algebra and functions
• Further calculus
• Further vectors

The remaining half is divided between two optional components, which are further mechanics and decision mathematics. The former extends the mechanics contact from the standard A Level, whilst the latter introduces concepts related to algorithms.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

This is a linear course, with four examinations completed at the end of Year 13. Each is one and a half hours long and calculators are allowed throughout. The first two papers examine the pure content whilst the third and fourth papers cover the optional components. Internal assessments will of course be completed regularly throughout the course. There is no coursework element.

How the course differs from GCSE

The new specifications have been designed to build on the new GCSE specification and build rapidly from the higher grade skills covered at that level. Potential further mathematic students should be confident GCSE students, particularly in the areas of proof, algebra and trigonometry.

Skills acquired

• To enable students to acquire extensive knowledge and skills with confidence, satisfaction and enjoyment.
• To give students experience of mathematical activities and develop resourcefulness in solving advanced problems
• To enable students to apply further mathematics and recognise its significance to other disciplines
• To develop students’ understanding of mathematical reasoning.

Where the course leads

This course is good for those students considering applying for a competitive degree course such as engineering, physics, mathematics and/or considering Oxbridge entry. Further mathematics is a very impressive qualification to have on your CV for university applications.

Special entry requirements

To study further mathematics you must also study A Level mathematics. This course is intended for students who have achieved at least a grade 7 in mathematics at GCSE and ideally a grade 8 or 9. Consequently, students will be expected to have studied the higher GCSE course and have a high degree of mathematical ability. Students will have to be highly motivated and able to work hard to reach deadlines. This is a course for students who enjoy mathematics and rise to a challenge!

Introduction

“Geography is the subject that holds the key to our future.” Michael Palin

We are constantly exposed to geographical issues in everyday life, including environmental concerns, natural disasters, climate change, local developments, urban and rural change, population movements, maps and tourism.

Geography is a subject which deals with challenges the world faces and attempts to offer sustainable solutions for our future welfare.

Summary of course content

Geography matters. That’s why this qualification offers a wide range of contemporary themes and issues, so students can understand the world around us and what could impacts its future. The topics contained within bridge the sciences and the arts, highlighting the huge range of skills and qualities that geographers possess.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Dramatic landscapes
• Tectonic processes and hazards
• Coastal landscape and change

Dynamic places
• Globalisation
• Regenerating places/diverse places

Physical systems and sustainability
• The water cycle and water insecurity
• The carbon cycle and energy security

Human systems and geopolitics
• Superpowers
• Health and human rights
• Migration
• Sovereignty

Investigation into a contemporary geographical issue
• Independent investigation

Assessment

Paper 1: Dynamic landscapes and physical systems and sustainability
Paper 2: Dynamic places and human systems and geopolitics
Paper 3: Synoptic investigation of a contemporary geographical issue
Coursework: 3,000-4,000 word geographical investigation

How the course differs from GCSE

Students will have two teachers, one delivering the physical geography content and the second delivering the human geography content. A range of learning strategies are used, such as discussions, outside speakers, making videos and presentations, as well as analysing recent news events and publications. There is an element of progression from GCSE but the work extends, develops and diversifies from what was studied previously. Throughout the course, students will increasingly develop their independence through structured research and investigative tasks.

Skills acquired

There is a whole host of skills acquired throughout the course, alongside numeracy, literacy and ICT. Students will develop the ability to think analytically and extend their investigative and teamwork skills through both independent learning and fieldwork. In addition, students will develop their independence through structured research and investigative tasks.

Where the course leads

Geography at A Level provides a wide and varied base for entry into university and many practical professions. It can be successfully combined with both arts and science subjects as a foundation for higher or further education. Geographers offer potential employers a wide range of transferable skills. For further details of potential careers, please see the website of the Royal Geographical Society.

Special entry requirements

This course does require a good level of ability in both English and mathematics, so students will be expected to have achieved grade 5’s in both at GCSE. It is not compulsory to have studied GCSE geography, but a grade 5 is recommended for those who have.
Students must be able to display a real interest in the challenges the world faces and be willing to participate in discussions, presentations and fieldwork.

Introduction

In recent years we have seen referenda on the future of the United Kingdom and our nation’s membership of the European Union. Additionally we have seen unprecedented interest levels in current affairs with the ever-changing global political landscape. Political decisions shape our lives now and in the future and for that reason alone it is of vital importance that young people are aware of how our government operates and what it means to be a politically active and informed citizen. A Level Government and Politics is the ideal subject to increase your awareness of issues in the world around you. Government and politics complements a range of other subjects at A Level, for example geography, PRE, history, business, languages and sociology.

Summary of course content

The course follows the Edexcel specification and covers the government and politics of the United Kingdom and global issues as well as a look at political ideas such as socialism, liberalism, conservatism and feminism. It addresses key debates in recent years about the direction and future of Britain. The course looks at how politics works in the UK, the role of the Prime Minister and parliament, addresses issues of voting behaviour and why people vote the way they do. It looks as key issues such as immigration, democracy, elections and electoral systems and political ideologies.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Politics Global

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Politics

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Students will study three topics over two years. Topics currently covered are:
• Unit 1: Politics of the UK and key ideas in politics
• Unit 2: Government of the UK and ideologies in action (feminism)
• Unit 3: Global politics

Skills acquired

Government and politics helps to develop:
• Analytical skills (vital when listening to others, speaking or when reading text)
• Listening and speaking skills (vital when working as part of a team or in the management or supervision of others)
• Written skills (vital when trying to put across clear and relevant views)

Where the course leads

Students who have studied government and politics are welcomed into a whole range of jobs that require enquiring and disciplined minds, analytical skills, a commitment to self-improvement and knowledge of the world, for example journalism, business, law, education, defence, civil service and many more. Unsurprisingly, the government and politics course offers excellent preparation for students entering higher education here or abroad.

Special entry requirements

All students wanting to take A Level government and politics must have achieved a grade 5 in English at GCSE. Students will have to be highly motivated and able to work hard to reach deadlines. They should demonstrate a genuine interest in government and politics. The ability to write extended answers is critical.

Introduction

The BTEC National Diploma in Health and Social Care is a new and very exciting course, based very heavily on vocational practice and requiring ongoing work placements working alongside health and social care professionals. It is a very challenging and extremely rewarding course to follow. The course encourages and nurtures young people to become confident and skilled young adults and students develop in numerous and varied ways. It is the equivalent of two A Levels and is a two year course.

Topics covered

There are eight units which are all assessed differently:
Human lifespan development: 90 minute external examination
Working in health and social care: 90 minute external examination
Enquiries into current research in health and social care: Three hours supervised time on pre-release material available six weeks in advance
Meeting individual care and support needs: Coursework
Principles of safe practice in Health and Social Care: Coursework
Promoting public health: Coursework
Work experience: 100 hours of vital experience in the health and social care sector.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Single

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Double

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Triple

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Single

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Double

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Triple

Coursework element

This coursework element is very flexible in terms of assessment methods so students can expect a variety of activities. These may include written reports and essays, witness statements from work placements, a diary of their experiences whilst on placement, display work and leaflets and guides for health workers. All of these are assessed as assignments which the teacher designs.

Methods of working

Students will be encouraged to take responsibility for their own progress and embrace the ethos of independent learning. Students must be prepared to be out of school on work placements. The course is challenging and demands a great deal of effort and effective time management and organisational skills. Students will need to be able to meet the deadlines as the course is continuously assessed. This said, students will be encouraged and supported fully.

Skills acquired

• Independence of thought and action
• Taking responsibility for themselves and their learning.
• Research skills
• Effective communication skills
• Organisational skills
• Caring for vulnerable children and adults
• Multi-tasking and handling pressure situations

Where the course leads

The course leads to further study in the area or to a career in the students’ chosen field. The students will be very skilled and equipped to take either path. It is a valuable and sought-after commodity for local service providers and university tutors alike. Former students have gone on to university courses in nursing, midwifery, occupational therapy, social work and teaching or directly into employment in care.

Special entry requirements

Students will be required to have achieved at least five grades 9-4 at GCSE level, including grade 5 in English.

Students should enjoy a mixture of teaching techniques and be motivated and enthusiastic. Students should also be prepared to work independently and want to fulfil their potential. In essence, students should have a passion for the subject area and a keen interest in working in a related field.

Introduction

History is not simply about dead people, but the way we respond to the legacy that they have left – without an understanding of what went before, how can we make sense of everyday conversations, the places we visit, the attitudes we hold or the things we love or loathe?

In the end, the knowledge developed may not last much longer than the last history exam, but the skills developed will last a lifetime!

Summary of course content

The course covers the history of Britain in the modern era and the development of early empire as well as Russia from 1855. As a department, we have chosen topics which we know students will love, which allow them to develop a through sense of chronology and historical understanding and which focus on the staff’s specialist subject areas.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

 

Topics covered

From September 2015, the specification in History was updated to reflect government changes to A Levels. As a result, students will study three topics over two years. The topics currently covered are:
• Unit 1 – Tsarist and Communist Russia, 1855-1964.
• Unit 2 – Making of modern Britain, 1951-2007.
• Unit 3 – Non Examined Assessment unit on Causes of The American Civil War.

How the course differs from GCSE

Whilst students will build upon the knowledge and skills acquired at GCSE, the material covered will be new, yet not so unfamiliar as to be daunting. Political, social, cultural and economic history will all feature in the course and allow students to develop skills essential to the workplace, general interest and living in a multi-cultural world. Students will have two or three teachers who teach one unit each.

Skills acquired

History helps to develop:
• Analytical skills, (vital when listening to others, speaking or reading text).
• Listening and speaking skills (vital when working as part of a team or in management/supervision of others).
• Written skills (vital when trying to put across clear and relevant views).

Where the course leads

Historians are welcomed into a whole range of jobs that require enquiring and disciplined minds, analytical skills, a commitment to self-improvement and a knowledge of the world. Previous A Level students are employed in a number of professions, from air traffic controllers to zoologists! Unsurprisingly, the history course offers excellent preparation for students entering higher education here or abroad. Past Lytchett historians have gone on to study history or politics at Russell Group and Oxbridge universities.

Special entry requirements

This course does require a good level of ability in English, so students will be expected to have achieved a grade 5 in English at GCSE. It is not compulsory to have studied GCSE history, but a grade 5 is recommended for those who have.
Students will have to be highly motivated and able to work hard to meet deadlines. They should demonstrate a genuine interest and love for learning about the past. The ability to write extended answers is critical.

Introduction

Mathematics is a fundamental subject; therefore skilled mathematicians are always in demand. A Level mathematics is a facilitating subject and will pave the way for many careers. On its own or in conjunction with other subjects, mathematics has always been highly regarded and many universities offer a wide variety of degree courses involving mathematics either as a subject in isolation or as part of a requirement for other courses.

Summary of course content

The new specification for mathematics is fixed for all students and two thirds of the curriculum is pure mathematics. This will include:

  • Proof
  • Algebra and functions
  • Coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane
  • Sequences and series
  • Differentiation and integration
  • Trigonometry
  • Exponentials and logarithms
  • Numerical methods
  • Vectors

The other third is applied mathematics and is evenly divided between mechanics (particularly useful for students also studying physics) and statistics (which readily complements a range of subjects such as economics, geography and psychology).

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Core and Decision

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Pure and Mechanics

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Pure and Statistics

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Core and Decision

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Pure and Mechanics

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Pure and Statistics

Assessment

This is a linear course with three examinations completed at the end of Year 13. Each exam in two hours long and calculators are allowed throughout. The first two papers examine the pure content whilst the third covers applied mathematics. Internal assessments will be completed regularly throughout the course to monitor progress and attainment. There is no coursework element.

How the course differs from GCSE

Students will have two teachers, one who teaches pure maths and mechanics and another who teaches pure maths and statistics. Pure maths and statistics will develop ideas that have been met at GCSE whilst mechanics will be new. There will be a much higher expectation set for rigorous working and mathematical argument. In sharp contrast to GCSE maths the majority of the practising of the skills learnt will take place outside of lessons.

Where the course leads

As a facilitating subject, mathematics A Level will be looked upon favourably by universities for applications to study social sciences as well as the more expected maths, science, computer science, engineering and finance degrees. According to research by UCL, students who take maths A Level are more likely to go on to study at a Russell Group university. It is generally accepted that studying A Level maths bestows a significant wage premium, thought to be around 10%. There is a shortage of people with advanced maths skills and the demand for these skills is increasing.

Special entry requirements

This course is for students who have achieved a grade 7-9 in mathematics at GCSE. Consequently students will be expected to have studied the higher GCSE course and have a high degree or mathematical ability. Students will have to be highly motivated and able to work hard to meet deadlines. There is more to the course than just attending lessons. Students must be logical thinkers, good problem solvers and enjoy a challenge. We want students to enjoy mathematics!

Introduction

This course is equally suitable for students who intend to continue their studies at university or music college, those who wish to extend their understanding and experience of music for its intrinsic value and interest or for those who relish the pleasure they derive from it.

Music A Level develops a unique combination of practical, creative, analytical and social skills. As a result, it is highly regarded as a qualification by universities for a wide variety of degree courses. Students at Lytchett Minster have access to unrivalled facilities:
• A suite of practice rooms
• Extensive ICT resources (including Cubase, Pro-tools and Sibelius software)
• A purpose-built theatre with a Yamaha grand piano.

All students taking music A Level are automatically included in the department’s Gifted and Talented programme, which includes trips to the Royal Opera House, London workshops and performances with professional musicians and regular BSO concerts.

We also give our students tailor-made guidance on local and national music opportunities and future career paths.

Topics covered

  • Vocal music
  • Instrumental music
  • Music for film
  • Popular music and jazz
  • Fusions
  • New directions

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

There are three units to the course:
Unit 1: Performing – An 8 minute recital in the final year of the course
Unit 2: Composing – Two pieces, one to a given brief (lasting one minute), the other a free choice (lasting 5 minutes)
Unit 3: Appraising – A two hour final exam, on set works (from the topics listed above) and unfamiliar music.

How the course differs from GCSE

Whereas music GCSE is open to all pupils, A Level music students should be at least grade 5 standard in an instrument at the start of the course. This is because it is not possible to access the highest mark brackets unless students are grade 7 by the end of the two year course. Though the free composition element of A Level will be familiar from GCSE, students also have to complete the technical composition tasks in the style of other composers. The course expects students to analyse set works in considerable details and to write extended essay answers on a weekly basis.

Skills acquired

Students will develop performance skills (solo and/or ensemble), compose music and learn about harmony. They will build up their aural and analytical skills by studying selections from set works and wider listening, drawing on styles including classical, pop and world music.

Where the course leads

Performing and teaching are perhaps the most obvious openings, but music A Level can also lead to a career in radio, television, film, recording, publishing, the retail trade, arts administration and music therapy. As well as developing practical musicianship skills, music A Level is also an academically respected subject, and past students have progressed to study the subject both at Russell Group universities and music conservatoires.

Special entry requirements

Students should have obtained at least grade 6 in GCSE music and be of grade 5 standard on an instrument. However, competent performers who have not taken GCSE music should consult Mrs Fulker about their suitability for the course.

Introduction

Lytchett offers an exciting range of courses across the performing arts spectrum. Students will be able to specialise in different performance or production areas or link qualifications together to follow a more holistic route.  Students can opt for a qualification in performing arts that is equivalent in size to 1 a-level (extended certificate) or 2 a-levels (diploma) numbers permitting

The BTEC performing arts courses are exciting vocational courses. Students will explore the business of the performing arts in a practical way, specialising in acting. Students will form a theatre company which will become the basis for all assessment. As a company, students will work alongside each other to create drama productions, developing their skills as both performers and practitioners.

We advise that students combine subjects to develop their skills, improve their employability and offer more progression routes to higher education.

Summary of course content

During the two year course, students will develop their existing skills in the relevant areas. They will produce performances and analyse live performances through regular theatre trips. The work is generally practical with students exploring new ideas through the artistic direction of their teachers.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Methods of working

Students will explore styles and ideas through workshops, exploration and full scale performances. Since the students are working as a theatre company, the majority of the tasks are production-based and all of them are relevant to current working practice.

Much of the work is experimental and looks at new ideas within theatre. Students will follow a varied and complex selection of units to develop their understanding of the performing arts business relevant to their area of expertise.

Performing Arts: Acting

Topics covered

• Investigation of performing arts and practitioners’ work
• Developing acting skills and techniques for live performance
• Group performance
• Acting styles and directing

Skills acquired

Students will develop skills specific to the performing arts business such as organising performances, budgets, risk assessments, funding and organisations. Acting students will develop both their technical performance skills through physical training whilst also working as directors and theatre practitioners.

Performing Arts: Dance

Topics covered

• Investigation of dance practitioners’ work
• Developing dance skills and techniques for live performance
• Group performance
• Choreography and dance technique

Skills acquired

Students will develop skills specific to the dance side of the performing arts business such as organising performances, budgets, risk assessments, funding and organisations. Dance students will develop both their technical performance skills through physical training whilst also working as choreographers exploring the structure and content of dance performance.

Assessment for acting and dance

Each student will complete four units which make up the BTEC Extended Certificate. Each unit is broken down into several different practical tasks.

Students will complete each task, making sure they have clear notes and have fulfilled the assessment criteria. The modules are either internally or externally assessed. Although the work and assessment are practically based, students are expected to keep log books of each production. Students must be focussed and dedicated in their note-taking and organisation.

Performing Arts: Production Arts

Topics covered

• Lighting
• Sound
• Stage design
• Costume design
• Stage management
• Events management
• Theatre maintenance/installation

Skills acquired

Students will develop skills specific to the performing arts business such as organising performances, budgets, risk assessments, funding and organisations. Production students will develop both their design and technical skills and learn to understand how to select and use technical equipment in both a practical and artistic way.

Assessment for production arts

Each student will complete two modules which make up the BTEC Foundation Diploma. Each unit is broken down into several different practical and theoretical tasks.

Students will complete each task making sure they have clear notes and have fulfilled the assessment criteria. The modules are internally assessed and then verified by an external verifier from EDEXCEL. Although the work and assessment are practically based, students are expected to keep log books of each production. Students must be focussed and dedicated in their note-taking and organisation.  Module F focuses more on the students career path and is an excellent opportunity to consider ways into the industry.

Where the course leads

Overall this course provide an excellent foundation for careers in the performing arts or as a foundation for relevant higher education courses. The course is the equivalent of two A Levels and carries exactly the same weighting and UCAS points. Past students have gone on to a variety of careers in the performing arts and university courses at a number of different universities.

Special entry requirements

As a minimum, students are expected to have achieved GCSE English at grade 4 and grade 4 or higher in GCSE drama or dance. Students who have not taken a drama or dance option need to discuss the course with Mrs Midworth prior to application.
All students will need to have demonstrated a commitment to attending rehearsals and working productively with others.

Introduction

The aim of A Level Philosophy, Religion and Ethics is to gain a new way of thinking about big questions that have affected humanity throughout our history. Students are encouraged to analyse logical arguments and develop their critical thinking by challenging premises and offering alternative explanations. Philosophy means the love of wisdom and students will explore the wisdom of philosophers from Socrates to Sartre. Attention is focussed on improving students’ ability to present a coherent and persuasive argument. Students will also have the opportunity to study Christianity in depth focusing on theological and social developments within the faith. To add to their learning experience we run a trip to Rome.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Christianity

Yr12 Curriculum Overview Philosophy

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Christianity

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Ethics

Yr13 Curriculum Overview Philosophy

Summary of course content

Students will be studying the following three components:
• A study of Christianity
• Philosophy of religion
• Religion and Ethics

A study of Christianity includes:
• The birth and resurrection of Jesus.
• Is Jesus divine?
• What authority does the Bible have in the modern world?
• Atonement
• The Trinity
• Is God male? Feminist views on the nature of God
• Christian attitudes towards money, migration and other faiths.
• The relationship between religion and science
• Festivals and rites of passage.

Philosophy of religion includes:
• Arguments for the existence of God: the Cosmological argument, the Teleological argument and Ontological argument
• The problem of evil: Augustinian Theodicy and Irenaean Theodicy
• Psychological explanations for religious faith: Freud and Jung.
• The rise of atheism in the 21st Century.
• Religious experiences and miracles
• Religious language: how can humans talk meaningfully about God?

A study of ethics includes:
• Divine Command Theory – Should I obey God?
• Virtue Ethics – Should I try to be the best version of myself?
• Ethical Egoism – Should I act in my own self-interest?
• Deontological ethics with reference to abortion, euthanasia, immigration and capital punishment.
• Teleological ethics: with reference to homosexual and polyamorous relationships, nuclear weapons and testing medicines on animals.
• Freewill and determinism – how free are humans?

Assessment

Students will be undertaking a two year linear course with three two hour exam papers, one per component.

Where the course leads

A qualification in Philosophy, Religion and Ethics is an asset in many career paths because it develops the skills of critical thinking, analysis, debate and empathy. Any student wishing to follow a career that involves interaction with the public would benefit from taking this course. For example, it would be valuable in the fields of health care, teaching, social care and the police force. Many of the world’s leaders have studied Philosophy. Many authors, comedians and musicians have studied Theology or Philosophy at university.

Special entry requirements

This course does require a good level of ability in English, so students will be expected to have achieved a grade 5 in GCSE English. It is not compulsory to have studied GCSE PRE, but a grade 5 is recommended for those who have.

Introduction

People often say that “physics is in everything,” and there is much truth in that. We can use its basic ideas – matter, force, energy and so on – to explain every aspect of our world, from the smallest particles to superclusters of galaxies.

We are all born with an urge to understand the world around us. Maybe those who haven’t outgrown this urge are on the road to becoming physicists and should consider taking A Level physics.

Summary of course content

Aside from its importance and flexibility, physics can be fascinating and fun. At its heart, it is about finding out and understand what lies behind everyday phenomena. The A Level course reflects this and combines practical work and theory.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Across the two year advanced course, the following topics will be covered:
• Measurements and their errors
• Particles and radiation
• Waves
• Mechanics and materials
• Electricity
• Further mechanics and thermal physics
• Fields and their consequences
• Nuclear physics

Optional topics in Year 13 are:
• Astrophysics
• Medical physics
• Engineering physics
• Turning points in physics
• Electronics

Assessment

There will be three examination papers, with each of them lasting two hours. Over the period of the two years, students will complete twelve required practicals. Students may be awarded a practical endorsement attached to their A Level if these practicals are completed to the appropriate standard. The skills gained during the practical work will be assessed as part of the examination papers.

How the course differs from GCSE

Lesson structure is similar but a much higher degree of independent learning is expected. A Level physics has a much greater mathematical content than either GCSE science or GCSE physics. Individual tuition or mentoring sessions are offered at lunchtimes to support students in their learning.

Skills acquired

Students following the course develop excellent problem-solving, analytical, mathematical and IT skills through written and practical work. Physics skills are highly prized by employers in almost every field imaginable.

As Simon Singh, science writer and broadcaster says, “I reckon that physicists can do pretty much anything. Our training can be applied to almost any activity, and it allows us to see things in ways that might be not obvious to others.”

When people ask “why?” or “how?,” it is usually physicists who can give the answers

Where the course leads

Employment prospects are excellent for those with a physics qualification. Astronomy, radiology, medicine, sports physics, meteorology, financial analysis, science journalism, etc all use physics. Engineering (civil, electrical, aero, space, chemical) are major shortage subjects which require physics. Physics teachers are very scarce too!

Special entry requirements

To study A Level physics students must also study A Level mathematics. This course is intended for students who have achieved at least a grade 7 in mathematics at GCSE and have achieved at least a grade 6 in GCSE Science/Additional Science or 6 in GCSE physics.

Introduction

The visual arts, from film production to photography and fine arts to fashion, are an integral part of our culture. This creative art and design-based course offers student the opportunity to explore the remarkable impact photography has on our lives and opens the door to a wide range of occupations, particularly within new media and communication. Covering a wide range of practical and research skills, this is a course for determined, motivated and creative individuals.

Topics covered

• Use of cameras; lenses, aperture, exposure
• Black and white photographic printing
• Photograms
• Studio lighting
• Digital photography
• Image manipulation and the use of image manipulation software
• Early developments in photography
• The photographic portrait
• Documentary photography
• The photographic avant-garde

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

You will be assessed on the practical work that you produce throughout the two year course. This will be supported by written annotation and research into other artists and designers and students will also be required to produce an extended essay as part of component one in Year 13. During Year 12, students will concentrate on acquiring and refining practical skills and learn how to use these alongside their artist research in the development and refinement of creative ideas.

Component one – Personal Investigation: In Year 13, you will produce a portfolio of work, covering a wide range of photographic processes and approaches. With this portfolio, you will show how you can develop ideas, concept or themes and refine work into an accomplished final piece. This will count for 60% of your total A Level mark.

Component two – Externally Set Assignment: You will be asked to produce practical photography-based work in response to one of eight exciting starting points issued by the examination board. This will count for 40% of your total A Level mark.

Methods of working

The majority of the course is practical and requires students to organise their time outside of lessons to seek out opportunities to take photographs as well as complete extensive coursework tasks.

Throughout the course, students will be expected to discuss and justify their work in group seminary and tutorials.

For the duration of Year 13 students are required to show increasing independence and intellectual challenge in their work.  We encourage independent visits to galleries, as well as organising group visits to local and national photography exhibitions and events.

Skills acquired

Students will learn black and white photographic processes as well as digital imaging techniques and how to use these in the production of a personal portfolio of creative work. The principles of critical and visual analysis of the work of a wide range of photographers and artists will be developed, identifying techniques used and exploring intentions and then incorporating these into the students’ own work.

Where the course leads

The visual arts offer an expanding and exciting range of careers for talented individuals in a growth area of the UK economy. Students can progress to a higher education course in a wide range of visual arts specialisms or in other subject areas. To progress to a degree in photography, students would normally be required to take a Foundation Diploma in Art and Design.

Special entry requirements

Organisation and tenacity are important attributes for a successful student, as well as motivation and the ability to seek out exciting image-making opportunities. For those students who have completed GCSE art and design they need to have achieved grade 5. Where no previous art qualification has been taken, prospective students will need to demonstrate a proven enthusiasm for the subject by producing a portfolio of work to show to the Head of Art.

Introduction

The visual arts, from film production to photography and fine arts to fashion, are an integral part of our culture. This creative art and design-based course offers student the opportunity to explore the remarkable impact photography has on our lives and opens the door to a wide range of occupations, particularly within new media and communication. Covering a wide range of practical and research skills, this is a course for determined, motivated and creative individuals.

Topics covered

• Use of cameras; lenses, aperture, exposure
• Black and white photographic printing
• Photograms
• Studio lighting
• Digital photography
• Image manipulation and the use of image manipulation software
• Early developments in photography
• The photographic portrait
• Documentary photography
• The photographic avant-garde

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

You will be assessed on the practical work that you produce throughout the two year course. This will be supported by written annotation and research into other artists and designers and students will also be required to produce an extended essay as part of component one in Year 13. During Year 12, students will concentrate on acquiring and refining practical skills and learn how to use these alongside their artist research in the development and refinement of creative ideas.

Component one – Personal Investigation: In Year 13, you will produce a portfolio of work, covering a wide range of photographic processes and approaches. With this portfolio, you will show how you can develop ideas, concept or themes and refine work into an accomplished final piece. This will count for 60% of your total A Level mark.

Component two – Externally Set Assignment: You will be asked to produce practical photography-based work in response to one of eight exciting starting points issued by the examination board. This will count for 40% of your total A Level mark.

Methods of working

The majority of the course is practical and requires students to organise their time outside of lessons to seek out opportunities to take photographs as well as complete extensive coursework tasks.

Throughout the course, students will be expected to discuss and justify their work in group seminary and tutorials.

For the duration of Year 13 students are required to show increasing independence and intellectual challenge in their work.  We encourage independent visits to galleries, as well as organising group visits to local and national photography exhibitions and events.

Skills acquired

Students will learn black and white photographic processes as well as digital imaging techniques and how to use these in the production of a personal portfolio of creative work. The principles of critical and visual analysis of the work of a wide range of photographers and artists will be developed, identifying techniques used and exploring intentions and then incorporating these into the students’ own work.

Where the course leads

The visual arts offer an expanding and exciting range of careers for talented individuals in a growth area of the UK economy. Students can progress to a higher education course in a wide range of visual arts specialisms or in other subject areas. To progress to a degree in photography, students would normally be required to take a Foundation Diploma in Art and Design.

Special entry requirements

Organisation and tenacity are important attributes for a successful student, as well as motivation and the ability to seek out exciting image-making opportunities. For those students who have completed GCSE art and design they need to have achieved grade 5. Where no previous art qualification has been taken, prospective students will need to demonstrate a proven enthusiasm for the subject by producing a portfolio of work to show to the Head of Art.

Introduction

Psychology studies human behaviour and tries to understand why people behave in the way they do. Psychology is made up of a variety of approaches and, during the first year of study, students will have the opportunity to learn about the origins of psychology, as well as the key approaches. In addition, students will explore the early years of development and its effects on the rest of life, how human memory works and eyewitness testimony, the stress that people experience, why humans obey and conform and the mental disorders that people can face.

In the second year, students build upon their knowledge of different approaches, and apply them to a range of behaviours. Throughout the course, students learn research method skills that will enable them to carry out their own studies relevant to the material covered.

Students are encouraged to read widely; the department has an extensive reading and podcast list to help prepare students for the course.

Summary of course content

The course provides a sound understanding of scientific methods and approaches to explaining human behaviour. It reviews research in many fields and applies ideas and concepts to a range of real-life situations.

Psychology Curriculum Map

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

In the first year, students will study a range of topics including:
• The origins and approaches in psychology
• Social influence
• Memory, attachment, psychopathology
• Biopsychology

In the second year, students will be given the opportunity to study three of the following areas:
• Relationships and gender
• Cognition and development
• Schizophrenia
• Eating behaviour
• Stress and aggression
• Forensic psychology
• Addiction
• There will also be an opportunity to learn additional content in topics such as the humanistic and psychodynamic approaches.

Students will undertake more practical research methods as well as learning in detail how to statistically analyse and critically evaluate results.

The psychology department plays host to an annual ‘Brain Day’ event, where Dr Guy Sutton gives a series of lectures on the field of neuro psychology as well as demonstrating a brain dissection.

Skills acquired

You will gain extensive understanding of human behaviours and interactions in a multitude of human fields from early socialisation, to relationships, to individual and cultural differences. It is important that students appreciate that psychology is considered to be a science. They will therefore acquire analytical and evaluative skills in terms of the rigour of the science involved in psychological experimentation and research. Students will need to have an affinity with the methods of scientific enquiry and have an interest in concepts such as reliability and validity.

Employment prospects are excellent for those with a physics qualification. Astronomy, radiology, medicine, sports physics, meteorology, financial analysis, science journalism, etc all use physics. Engineering (civil, electrical, aero, space, chemical) are major shortage subjects which require physics. Physics teachers are very scarce too!

Assessment

It is important to note that, to achieve a full A Level in psychology, students will be assessed by three two hour examinations at the end of the second year. Each paper will consist of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing requirements. There is no coursework element.

Where the course leads

There is hardly a walk of life in which psychology is not useful. The emphasis on understanding human behaviour gives valuable insights for those working with other people.

Psychology is particularly valued in health care, personnel, the media, marketing, retail management, educational psychology, social work, probation work, teaching and the police force.

Special entry requirements

A keen interest in understanding human behaviour, the ability to write essays and a desire to question psychological findings/behaviour is required. The nature of the course is such that students must have achieved GCSE grade 5 or above in mathematics, science and English. Students studying triple science will be required to have achieved a minimum 5 in Biology.

Introduction

Sociology is the study of society and its institutions (families, media, educational, criminal, religious and political). It investigates how people create society through their relationships and the ways in which society shapes people’s behaviour and ideas.

Sociology is a critical subject because it avoids obvious or common sense explanations of human activity, such as changes in divorce, crime, education, searching instead for explanations at a deeper level.

Summary of course content

Students will examine topics such as social inequality, education, crime and deviance, race, ethnicity, mass media and ideas such as power, socialisation and social control. They will also look at methods used by sociologists to explain human attitudes and actions such as surveys and observational techniques.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

• Families and households
• Education
• Research methods
• Sociology theory
• Crime and deviance
• Beliefs in society

Assessment

Students will sit three two hour written examinations.

Methods of working

The A Level course involves knowledge and understanding of research facts, ideas and theories and incorporates analysis, interpretation and evaluation of theories and concepts.

The new AQA specification in Sociology does not assess coursework assignments but expect students to apply their knowledge and understanding to a range of topic areas and develop more critical thinking in the context of sociological fields such as media and crime.

Skills acquired

• The new specification provides essential knowledge and understanding of central aspects of society: legal rulings, social policies and cultural differences.
• The ability to differentiate between different theoretical perspectives and not to accept research data or statistics at face value.
• The ability to demonstrate skills of application, analysis, interpretation and evaluation.

Where the course leads

Sociology is a very thought-provoking subject whose usefulness covers a wide variety of situations – academic, social, business and welfare. It is a valuable asset in many careers such as personnel, business, marketing, market research, management, politics, advertising, probation, teaching, the police force, nursing, social and welfare services and journalism.

Special entry requirements

Students should have the ability to think broadly, read critically and write clearly. A GCSE grade 5 or above in English  is required. Students should also have an interest in a wide range of special issues and debates.

Introduction

Globalisation of world markets, the expansion of the European Community and increasing opportunities for travel are creating an environment in which language skills can open more and more doors. However, languages really come into their own when set alongside expertise in another field. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that Spanish will nowadays combine with any other A Level subjects.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

Topics covered across the two years:

Changes in Spanish society
• The family structure
• The impact of tourists in Spain
• The world of work

The political and artistic culture in Spanish-speaking countries
• Music
• Media
• Festivals and traditions

Immigration and the multicultural Spanish society
• Immigration
• Integration and multiculturalism

The Franco dictatorship and the transition to democracy
• The Franco dictatorship
• The passage from dictatorship to democracy

Students will also study two Spanish works – a book and a film:
Bodas de Sangre and El laberinto de fauno.

Assessment

Three papers:
• Listening, reading and translation
• Written response to works (book and film) and translation
• Speaking

How the course differs from GCSE

In terms of content, the emphasis shifts from students’ needs as a visitor to a Spanish speaking country to look at contemporary issues from a Spanish perspective. As regards the actual exam, there are two important differences:
• The exams and 4 skills are spread over 3 papers, rather than 4.
• The culture of Spain is integral to the course

Skills acquired

Building on the language acquired at GCSE, students learn to express themselves with increasing accuracy and sophistication, both orally and in writing, on a wide range of issues of contemporary interest. At the same time, they learn to tackle authentic written and spoken texts of an increasingly complex nature. In doing so, they gain an insight into the culture and values of another society.

Where the course leads

Specialist language occupations include interpreting, translating and teaching. However, in an increasingly international environment, practically any job, whether based in the UK or abroad, can involve the use of languages. For those who go on to Higher Education, it is possible to study Spanish alongside a wide range of other subjects.

Special entry requirements

Students will need at least a grade 6 in GCSE Spanish.

They should have an interest in the issues of the day and in the culture of Spanish-speaking countries, along with an enthusiasm for discussing these in Spanish. If possible, they should spend at least one reasonable period in Spain during the course.

Introduction

BTEC in sport is an exciting vocational opportunity. This specialist course includes core content plus a range of bespoke units to equip students with the skills they need in the workplace or on specialist higher education courses and ultimately to become employable in the sport sector.

The introduction of this course will enable students to combine with other A Levels in order to meet their specific interests.

Summary of course content

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma is equivalent to 3 A Levels and also carriers the equivalent UCAS points. This is an opportunity to study Sport as a whole. The BTEC Level 3 National Diploma is equivalent to 2 A Levels, It has been designed as part of a two year programme, normally in conjunction with one or more qualifications at Level 3. Or you also have the opportunity to study the BTEC National Level 3 Extended Certificate equivalent to 1 A Level designed as a two year programme alongside 2 other A Levels.
Students will explore the major body systems, show an understanding of client screening and lifestyle assessment, fitness training methods and fitness programming, explore the knowledge and skills required for different career pathways in the sports industry and gain as understanding of the requirements of fitness testing.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Topics covered

There are up to 12 units depending on the course pathway chosen. Some of the core units covered in both the diploma and the extended diploma are shown below.

Unit 1: Anatomy and physiology
Unit 2: Fitness training and programming for health, sport and well-being
Unit 3: Professional development in the sports industry
Unit 4: Sports Leadership
Unit 7: Practical Sports Performance
Unit 8: Coaching for Performance
Unit 18: Work Experience
Unit 19: Development and provision of Sport and Physical Activity
Unit 22: Investigating Business in Sport and the Active Leisure Industry
Unit 23: Skill Acquisition In Sport

Assessment

The new BTEC in sport uses a combination of assessment styles to give students the confidence to apply their knowledge in order to succeed in the workplace. It will also provide the relevant skills to aid students wishing to progress to higher education. The wider range of vocational assessments, both practical and written, ensures that students can showcase their learning and achievements in a variety of ways: assignments, pre-released tasks and written exams.

Unit 1 (Anatomy and physiology): 1hr 30 min written exam
Unit 2 (Fitness training and programming for health, sport and well-being): 2 hour pre-released task
Unit 19 (Development and provision of Sport and Physical Activity): 2 hour pre-released task
Unit 22 (Investigating Business in Sport and the Active Leisure Industry): 3 hr pre-released task and exam

Students are expected to keep files of written coursework, log books of practical performance and be involved in sport both inside and outside of school.

Methods of Working

Students will take part in a number of practical activities, interviews, and vocational situations and will be involved in visits to local sports facilities and organisations.
Students will work independently and also in smaller groups on tasks and assignments.

Where the course leads

The course provides an excellent foundation for careers in sport science, sporting excellence, health and fitness industries and relevant higher education courses. The qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers as contributing to admission requirements for many courses.

Special entry requirements

Students are expected to have achieved GCSE grade 4 in PE or Biology, alongside GCSE English and maths at grade 4.
It is an expectation that students are actively involved in sport on a regular basis.

Introduction

Are you interested in textiles and fashion? If so, this course would provide you with the opportunity to produce high quality and original practical work as well as develop your knowledge of this exciting field within art and design. This is a rewarding course for students who have demonstrated a proven enthusiasm for art and design and a desire to develop this through creative textiles. If you are a determined and ambitious student, studying this subject could lead to a wide range of careers within the visual arts.

Topics covered

• Practical exploration and refinement of the use of a broad range of textiles materials, processes and techniques, e.g. fabric embellishment, manipulation and construction, printing onto fabrics, soft sculpture, batik, and general art and design skills of drawing, printmaking and digital imaging.
• How ideas can be conveyed and interpreted in images and artefacts.
• The application of knowledge or other artists’ and designers’ work to develop ideas and provide sources of inspiration.
• Visits to local and national art, craft and design exhibitions will take place throughout the course.
• How to critically evaluate your own work and present ideas to an audience.

Yr12 Curriculum Overview

Yr13 Curriculum Overview

Assessment

You will be assessed on the practical work produced throughout the two year course. This will be supported by written annotation and research into other artists and designers and students will also be required to produce an extended essay as part of component one in year 13. During year 12, students will concentrate on acquiring and refining practical skills and learn how to use these alongside their artist research in the development and refinement of creative ideas.
Component one – Personal Investigation: In year 13, you will develop work for a personal investigation into an idea, concept or theme, supported by written material; this will count for 60% of your total A Level marks.
Component two – Externally Set Assignment: You will be asked to produce personal work in response to one of eight exciting starting points, which will count for 40% of your total A Level mark.

Methods of working

The majority of the course involves experimentation and refinement of practical textile design skills; however in developing students’ critical understanding there is a significant amount of written work. We encourage independent visits to galleries and museums, as well as organising group visits to local and national art and design exhibitions and events.

Skills studied include visual recording incorporating a wide range of textile techniques such as free machine embroidery, batik and printmaking. Textiles involves students refining their skills in using colour, pattern and surface decoration in the creation of innovative personal work that shows insight into historical and contemporary textile design.

Skills acquired

Students will acquire skills in the use of formal elements (line, tone, texture, colour, shape and form); understanding composition, rhythm, repetition, scale and structure; understanding working practices, briefs and audiences as well as the different roles and functions of textile design; using appropriate materials, techniques and processes; understanding the relevance of contextual issues.

Where the course leads

The visual arts is a growth area in the UK economy and offers an expanding and exciting range of careers for talented individuals. Students can progress to a higher education course in a wide range of visual art specialisms or in other subject areas.

Special entry requirements

Self-motivation and tenacity are important attributes for a successful textiles student for this demanding but rewarding course. It is preferable that students achieve a grade 5 or above in Art and Design or Textiles at GCSE. Where no previous art qualification has been taken, prospective students will need to demonstrate a proven enthusiasm for the subject.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Travel and Tourism
For further information, please see Miss Thomas, or email thomasl@lytchett.org.uk

INTRODUCTION

The travel and tourism industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the UK. The value of tourism to the UK economy is approximately £209 billion, and the sector employs around 4
million people. In addition to the travel and tourism sector specific content, the requirements of the qualification will mean that learners develop transferable skills, which are highly
regarded by higher education providers and employers. This qualification gives a broad introduction to the travel and tourism industry, with an emphasis on core knowledge and
fundamental skills that are transferable across other sectors. No prior study of the sector is needed, just a passion for discovering the world!

TOPICS COVERED

Year 12
Unit 1 - The World of Travel and Tourism
– this will develop the skills you need to examine, interpret, and analyse a variety of statistics that measure the importance of tourism to the UK.
You will also learn how organisations work together to benefit both themselves and their customers.
Unit 3 - Principles of Marketing in Travel and Tourism – this will help you to develop a successful marketing plan for use by travel and tourism organisations to attract and engage with
customers using market research data. This unit will explore the different stages of the process that an organisation goes through when developing its marketing campaign, as well as the
importance of meeting customer expectations and communicating with customers effectively.
Year 13
Unit 2 - Global Destinations – you will investigate the features,appeal, and importance of different global destinations. You will also analyse consumer trends and the reasons the popularity of
global destinations may change and evaluate how well travel plans/routes/ itineraries meet customer needs.
Unit 9 - Visitor Attractions – you will investigate visitor attractions and the different ways they are funded, and also explore what is meant by the visitor experience and how visitor attractions develop, diversify and use technology in order to meet the needs of their different types of visitors.
 

SKILLS ACQUIRED

You will develop core academic and employability skills such as oral and written communication, resilience, and problem solving. Emphasis is on independent learning and teamwork,
research skills, project-based research and development & presentation skills. In addition to the sector-specific content, the requirements of this course also help you to develop skills
such as self-confidence, self-presentation, personal discipline and time management.

ASSESSMENT

The Extended Certificate in Travel and Tourism (equivalent to one A Level) is assessed through a combination of coursework and external assessment methods, including an exam.
Coursework - 42% (Unit 3 and 9)
Examinations - 58% (Unit 1 - examination, Unit 2 – controlled)

  Unit Size (GLH) Assessment
Unit 1 90 Externally Assessed (Examination)
Unit 2 120 Externally Assessed (Controlled Assessment)
Unit 3 90 Externally Assessed (Assignment)
Unit 9 60 Externally Assessed (Assignment)

WHERE THE COURSE LEADS

The Travel and tourism industry is one of the most exciting and vibrant in the world. This course will equip you with universally transferable skills and the confidence to pursue a career in the
fast-paced travel industry. The subject often leads to careers in Hotel Management, Airline Management, Cabin Crew, Tour Operations, Travel Agent, Event Management. Many students
also go on to study in Travel and Tourism related areas such as Tourism Management or Business-related degrees.

MINIMUM ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of five GCSE subjects at grade 4 or above including Maths and English.